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UNDERSTAND DYSLEXIA

Don’t miss the chance to learn about:

  • Introduction to Dyslexia
  • Supporting children with Dyslexia in Class
  • Introduction to structured literature(Otton Gillingham based program)
  • Inclusion of children with learning difficulties in literature and numeracy

 Venue

Online Zoom Meetings:
Meeting ID: 836 4398 1079
Passcode: 590913


 Dates

Saturdays of 27th Nov 4th Dec 11th Dec and 18th Dec
Time: 9:00AM – 12:00 NOON


Registration Fees

Lipa Rent na Mpesa

PAYBILL NUMBER: 847279
KES 4,000.00
ACCOUNT NUMBER: YOUR NAME


 

 

Our Stories for Educators

Edited By Shawn Anthony Robinson

In today’s educational space, no student who struggles with reading should be denied a fair and equal education just because teachers are not trained to understand the implications of dyslexia. Failing to learn to read is not failing to learn. It merely means that the orthodox methods of whole-language reading instruction have not favored those students who need specific multisensory instruction.

In Narratives from Mothers of Children with Dyslexia: Our Stories for Educators, mothers share personal stories of pain in navigating educational spaces for the success of their sons and daughters who are dyslexic. Despite resistance from within the PreK–12 academy, these mothers have become warriors for education.

The narratives in this text are global ones, from Singapore, India, Kenya, Spain, Great Britain, and the United States, and are in local “dialect.” The mothers use a variety of terms to describe their experiences, but the differences in language only prove that the language of experience is universal; we can understand everyone, even if they use different terms or names. We understand what they have learned through the challenges and struggles of serving as the backbone of their child’s education. We can easily translate that experience into the global, universal expression of a parent’s love for their child.

Get a copy here>>

MAKING A DIFFERENCE TO A CHILD WITH DYSLEXIA IN KENYA.